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Painter Tarps

Painter Tarps

The painter's tarps absorb most paint spills and protect the floor. Our painters tarps are very thick and strong and will last a paint contractor job after job. In most interior situations, canvas painter tarps offer superior protection as appose to plastic tarps. Canvas painter's tarps stay put, especially on rugs or couches. The plastic tarps will slide and do not react well to a slippery floor. The painter tarps can be laid down and do not slide around. The plastic tarps must be taped to the floor which adds to the setup time. If you are the novice painter or a professional paint contractor we are sure that you will be very with our painters tarps.


Painter Tarps
PRICE
SALE PRICE
QTY
ADD
Painters Tarps 4'x12'

Painters Tarps 4'x12'

TP-PT412-1
$33.60
Canvas Drop Cloth 4' x 15'

Canvas Drop Cloth 4' x 15'

$40.00 TP-CDC415
$19.95
Painters Tarps 4'x20'

Painters Tarps 4'x20'

TP-PT420-1
$56.00
Painters Tarps 9'x12'

Painters Tarps 9'x12'

TP-PT912-1
$75.60
Canvas Drop Cloth 12' x 12'

Canvas Drop Cloth 12' x 12'

$70.00 TP-CDC1212
$39.95
Painters Tarps 12'x15'

Painters Tarps 12'x15'

TP-PT1215-1
$134.40
Canvas Drop Cloth 15' x 15'

Canvas Drop Cloth 15' x 15'

$90.00 TP-CDC1515
$49.95
Put the painter's tarp on the ground and right up against the wall and you will never have to worry about drips. You can always be sure of the quality of our painter tarps.

Painter Tarps And How They Make Your Job Easier.

When it comes to painting, one of the most difficult things to deal with is the cleanup. The point of paint is to be at least somewhat permanent, which is why it's so hard to clean. And the best kind of mess to clean is one you never made, which is why most any painter lays down painter tarps first. There are two different kinds that the majority of painters tarps use: plastic and canvas. Canvas tarps are significantly more expensive, but not without cause. One of the biggest advantages to canvas is that it lasts longer. It also keeps paint from splashing both when it lands on it and if you happen to step in paint spills because it absorbs the paint rather than just catching it. It also doesn't slide as much as plastic does and doesn't need to be taped down.

The plastic painter tarp counterparts have their advantages as well. Plastic tarps are thinner, so it's easier to keep them flush with whatever surface your covering, allowing for less chance of overall spill. They take longer to dry, but they won't soak through either, so any paint that gets on them stays there. The greatest thing about them is that they're a lot cheaper and a lot lighter, so many painters like to buy several rolls of them or have them in bulk (especially professionals). Regardless of what type of painters tarps you chose, the effect is going to be the same. The reason for having one is to keep paint from getting to places that you don't want paint, like on your floor (especially if there's carpet). Most people lay them down on their floors, but some drape them across walls or ceilings as well, but that's usually in the case of air-brush painting. The painters tarps are not just for your typical paint job like painting a room or a railing. Artistic painters like to use them in smaller sizes for when they paint as well. They're especially helpful to the "splash" or finger-painter that uses projectile forms of painting. But the singular purpose of protecting what you don't want painted remains intact. Painter tarps are universal, but, as their name implies, they're best used for painting jobs. Canvas is typically better than plastic, but it would depend on the job overall. But so long as paint is involved and cleanup is the issue, any painter would tell you to invest in a few.